Tag Archives: A Portuguese Christmas

A delicious and easy Portuguese Cranberry Sauce Recipe.

Did you know that Thanksgiving doesn’t exist in Portugal? In fact, many Portuguese have never heard of Thanksgiving.
And, if you were in Portugal in November and wanted to prepare a Thanksgiving dinner, you would soon find that many of the ingredients are non-existent.

Looking for pecans to bake a pecan pie? Nope!
Canned pumpkin for pumpkin pie? Hah!
Cranberries for cranberry sauce? Nope, again. And certainly you won’t find canned cranberry sauce (my fave!) in any of the supermarkets.

However, you might find dried cranberries, although it’s interesting to note that the Portuguese do not have a name for cranberries, although the word “oxicoco” is sometimes used.

The good news is that you will be able to purchase a fresh turkey and roasted chestnuts from the many street vendors. Add a loaf of crusty Portuguese bread, a bottle of Port, and enjoy your Thanksgiving feast!

Here’s a recipe for “Portuguese” cranberry sauce. Note that dried cranberries and port wine are listed in the ingredients.

You will need:
Water to moisten
6 apples
Approximately 7 cups of dried cranberries
Port wine (I use most of the bottle!)
¾ cup brown sugar
Cinnamon and cloves to taste

Mix all ingredients and simmer on stove.

Do you have a favorite cranberry sauce recipe? Please share below.

Love to learn about other countries and holiday traditions? Snag a copy of A Portuguese Christmas, my sweet romance novella. Available on Amazon and all e-book stores, as well as paperback and audible.

Check out the youtube video here.

Does it snow in Portugal during the holiday season?

Feliz Natal means Merry Christmas in Portuguese!

I had such fun writing A Portuguese Christmas, my sweet romance contemporary novella. And, in turn, I learned a great deal about Portugal, and the country’s lack of snow during the holiday season.

The story is set in December. Krystal Walters, the heroine, is an American professional surfer, and is competing in Portugal during the holidays in a world-class surfing event. She misses the snow, and envisions returning to her home in wintry Rhode Island to celebrate Christmas with her father.

However, the average temperature in Portugal in December/January boasts a high of 59 degrees, with temperatures dipping to a low 46 degrees. So, snow is very rare, especially in the cities, such as Lisbon.

Through my research, I also learned that Portugal’s climate is diverse. The river Tejo runs through Lisbon, and any regions south are warm and dry, and reportedly it’s only snowed there once in twenty years.

Any regions north of the river are rainy and cold in winter.

Here’s the first cover of A Portuguese Christmas.

The hero, Adolfo, is an olive farmer, and, to me, this hero didn’t look like a man who farms. Those of you who’ve heard me praise my wonderful cover artist, know I trust her judgement. However, in addition to a hero who didn’t fit my vision, she forgot one important thing. There’s no snow in Portugal!

However, I LOVE the hero on my current cover, which was unanimously approved by my reader’s group!

The moment world-class surfer Krystal disappears under a mountain of sea water, Adolfo’s single-minded focus shifts from running his Portuguese olive farm to keeping the sun-kissed American spitfire safe. But first he’ll have to convince her that spending Feliz Natal with him isn’t the end of the world. Because she’s become the center of his.

Do you like snow during the holiday season, or do you prefer warm, sunny weather?

Feliz Natal!

A Portuguese Christmas is on pre-order and will be available November 7th for all ebook retailers, audible, and paperback.

Amazon

Reserve your copy today!

And check out the youtube video here.

Is Halloween observed in Portugal?

In my research for A Portuguese Christmas, I learned that Halloween is not observed in Portugal, although the observance of the American Halloween exists in the more rural areas.

On October 31st and November 1st, children go from door to door and ask for sweets, such as honey, walnuts, and small cakes.

However, November 1st is All Saints Day, a Holy day that dates back 1000 years. Because Portugal is predominantly a Catholic country, people visit cemeteries and honor their dead friends and family.

How will you be celebrating Halloween this year? I’ve learned not to buy Halloween candy too far ahead, or it will be eaten by the time Halloween arrives!

A Portuguese Christmas, my sweet romance holiday novella, is on pre-order, and available on Amazon, as well as all ebook retailers.
Also available on paperback and audio.

Snag your copy today!